Sweeping Away Nests

Our lives have been fraught with worry and anxiety lately. Nothing is as it was. The roller coaster is slamming against the rails, taking us on a frightful ride. My brain is full of scary scenarios. My heart hurts with unknowns.

I have been so overwhelmed I have trouble breathing. Breathing is life. How can this be? So I continue to take cautious breaths, knowing this will calm the frantic mind.

Mark Twain once wrote, “Worrying is like paying a debt you don’t owe.” It clogs life with despair, but how does one meet worry at the door and demand it leave the premises? Where can peace be found amid chaos?

Writing helps, but I am often stuck. The words are caught in my throat, choking me, but I still crank it out, even if it is meaningless babble jotted down in my journal.

Yoga is always there, beckoning me with moves of peace. It allows me to put aside the uncertainty and uneasiness for an hour.

I have begun to meditate, even for five or ten minutes a day. The quiet surrounds me. I request dark thoughts to vamoose.

A long walk can bring harmony. I take in the budding trees and soak in the bright sunlight. It heals with every step.

Sometimes the daily mundane tasks clear the distress that plagues the brain.

The Buddhists believe the act of sweeping calms the mind and becomes meditation through concentration, so I often grab a broom and sweep my dark wood floor, pushing the dirt and worry toward the door and away from my peace.

There is a Chinese proverb that states, “That the birds of worry and care fly over your head, this you cannot change, but that they build nests in your hair, this you can prevent.” 

I am working every day to sweep the messy nests out of my hair.

“The sweeper of the street is a leader in his own respect provided he does his job well with all love, diligence and attention than anyone would do when given the same broom sticks.” - Israelmore Ayivor

“The sweeper of the street is a leader in his own respect provided he does his job well with all love, diligence and attention than anyone would do when given the same broom sticks.” - Israelmore Ayivor